Permanent TAZs (1994)

Today’s article by Hakim Bey develops the concept of a Permanent Autonomous Zone (PAZ). It is an evolutionary step based upon Bey’s earlier idea of Temporary Autonomous Zones (TAZ). Any mistakes are solely that of the author himself.

 

 

TAZ-theory tries to concern itself with existing or emerging situations rather than with pure utopianism.   All over the world people are leaving or “disappearing” themselves from the Grid of Alienation and seeking ways to restore human contact.   An interesting example of this – on the level of “urban folk culture’ – can be found in the proliferation of hobby networks and conferences.   Recently I discovered the zines of two such groups, Crown Jewels of High Wire (devoted to the collection of glass electrical insulators) and a journal on cucurbitology (The Gourd).   A vast amount of creativity goes into these obsessions.   The various periodic gatherings of fellow-maniacs amount to genuine face-to-face (unmediated) festivals of eccentricity.   It’s not just the “counter-culture” which seeks its TAZs, its nomad encampments and nights of liberation from the Consensus.   Self-organized and autonomous groups are springing up amongst every “class” and “sub-culture”.   Vast tracts of the Babylonian Empire are now virtually empty, populated only by the spooks of MAssMedia, and a few psychotic policemen. Continue reading

The Agorist Cookbook (2011)

Today’s article is a parody of the lame and inaccurate so-called Anarchist Cookbook. It was written by privateer, of the real-life #agora IRC channel. For more information on agorism, please feel free to read An Agorist Manifesto in 95 Theses,” “Fifty Things to Do Now,” “An Agorist Anecdote,” “#agora,” and of course,Alongside Night.”

 

 

The Agorist Cookbook Introduction

This site is a place for Documenting: Tips, Tricks, Tools, Systems, Methods related to Operating in the Agorist Second Realm of Meatspace and Cyberspace. You will find a proverbial Wiki of Recipes for Agorist Markets and Living. A decent brief description from the Wikipedia Agorism entry describes Agorism as:

 

A political philosophy founded by Samuel Edward Konkin III and developed with contributions by J. Neil Schulman that holds as its ultimate goal bringing about a society in which all “relations between people are voluntary exchanges – a free market.” The term comes from the Greek word “agora,” referring to an open place for assembly and market in ancient Greek city-states. Ideologically, it is a term representing a revolutionary type of free-market anarchism. Schulman integrated the idea of counter-economics into Konkin’s libertarian philosophy, which is the advocacy of untaxed black market activity.

  Continue reading

Temporary Autonomous Zones (1991)

Today’s article by Hakim Bey is about carving out tiny pockets of freedom wherever you can. Bey seems to argue that such pockets are more likely to be mobile than stationary. Any mistakes are solely that of the author himself.

 

speakeasies & raves

 

 

“…this time however I come as the victorious Dionysus, who will turn the world into a holiday…Not that I have much time…”

–Nietzsche (from his last “insane” letter to Cosima Wagner)

 

Pirate Utopias

THE SEA-ROVERS AND CORSAIRS of the 18th century created an “information network” that spanned the globe: primitive and devoted primarily to grim business, the net nevertheless functioned admirably. Scattered throughout the net were islands, remote hideouts where ships could be watered and provisioned, booty traded for luxuries and necessities. Some of these islands supported “intentional communities,” whole mini-societies living consciously outside the law and determined to keep it up, even if only for a short but merry life. Some years ago I looked through a lot of secondary material on piracy hoping to find a study of these enclaves–but it appeared as if no historian has yet found them worthy of analysis. (William Burroughs has mentioned the subject, as did the late British anarchist Larry Law–but no systematic research has been carried out.) I retreated to primary sources and constructed my own theory, some aspects of which will be discussed in this essay. I called the settlements “Pirate Utopias.” Continue reading

Financial Independence: The Utility of Import-Export

“I often encourage folks who are preparedness-minded to develop a second income stream with a home-based business. Once you have that business started, then start another one…[a] successfully recession-proof home-based business is likely to be one in which the demand for your goods and services is consistent – even in a weak economy…[k]eep in mind that if you choose publishing or another mail-order venture selling something compact and lightweight, then you can take advantage of a national or even global market. But if you are selling a service or a relatively bulky or heavy hand-crafted item, then your market will be essentially local, so choose your venture wisely.”

James Rawles

 

 

Good Americans within the servile society typically “commute” five days a week in order to work eight hours per day. These “workers” often stop by grocery stores or similar businesses on their way home from work so as to pick up dinner every other day, or at least a few times a week. The problem with such a lifestyle is that the frequency of traveling to and fro on the government’s “public” roads increases the vulnerability to coercion of said motorists due to traffic stops.

Imagine, if you will, a noticeably different lifestyle whereby you travel once a week to a job site and work overtime while you’re there, and by the end of the week you go home. Similarly, you only shop for groceries once every few weeks or even several months out. Notice, too, that it’s not just the frequency of exporting labor and products relative to importing knowledge and supplies, but also the context of how you’re doing it.

Financial independence (FI) could be defined as making a livelihood without a steady employer. Absent a nine-to-five Just Over Broke (a “JOB”), many Good Americans literally wouldn’t know what to do with themselves, sadly because they are often indoctrinated to believe that their sense of self-worth is tightly bound to the consumerist fantasy of developing a “career,” an idea that has little to do with survivability and much to do with Stockholm Syndrome with the servile society itself. Often, FI can take the form of freelancing (working for a variety of clients on a per assignment basis) and/or intensive saving (a form of frugality whereby you save 50% – 80% of your take-home-pay). Continue reading

The Philosophy of Vonu (TVP Season 1 Overview)

“The ethical principal of non-coercion can be stated: One should not initiate the use of physical force against a volitional being or against property created or acquired through voluntary consent. Many people espouse this principle.”

Rayo

 

 

For this first season of The Vonu Podcast, Shane Radliff and I focused on the ideological pillars of vonu. The list of articles covering topics mentioned during season one of TVP are as follows:

Philosophically, vonu is inherently anti-political. Much like agorism, vonu outright rejects political crusading and collective-movementism, as well as the controlled schizophrenia underpinning both of them. The servile society incorporates all three of these phenomena so as to keep individuals trapped into being vulnerable to coercion, especially by the State. Continue reading

[URGENT] LIBERTY OF THE PRESS IS STILL UNDER ATTACK: Federal Marshals Arrest a Journalist

4/3/17 UPDATE: Additional details have become available, and have been added to this press release. The original material that initially went to press has remained the same.

Please Share & Re-Post on Your Blogs

By: Kyle Rearden

March 30th, 2017

“These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should be not highly rated.”

Thomas Paine

 

 

It has come to our attention that there has been a development regarding the prosecution (persecution) of journalist Gary Hunt. This past January, the documented use of lawfare was proven through judicial transparency thanks to the release of court documents. These documents show that United States Attorney Pamala Holsinger tried to convince Judge Anna Brown that Hunt was in possession of what she considered to be contraband, which was actually discovery evidence. Continue reading

Taking a Hard Stand: The Unauthorized Biography of LaVoy Finicum

[Download a PDF of this article]

“The informed resister in crisis situations is not surprised by the occurrence of brutalities against the nonviolent group. In reaction, either to halt the defiance or to resort to violence would have serious negative consequences. To be effective, the resisters must persist through the brutalities and suffering and maintain their fearlessness, nonviolent discipline, and firmness. Some time and considerable suffering may be required to demonstrate to the opponents that brutalities will not crush the movement.”

Gene Sharp

 

 

From 2014 – 2016, the late LaVoy Finicum made his foray into the alternative media as a vlogger. During this period within 2015, he also managed to get his novel published as a way to finance his mounting legal costs that were incurred thanks to the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Although most people remember Finicum as that member of Citizens for Constitutional Freedom (C4CF) known as the #TarpMan, who really was LaVoy Finicum and what did he actually believe in?

Robert “LaVoy” Finicum was born on January 27th of 1961 in Kanab, Utah. He worked on a drilling rig in his early twenties, and later in a sawmill within the town of Fredonia, Arizona. Finicum was a teetotalerprepper” as well as a Mormon. Continue reading

The Land (1999)

Today’s article is a chapter within Brian Kelling’s 1999, Travel-Trailer Homesteading Under $5,000.” I figured that as part of an eventual article I’d like to write about strategic relocation, this background material would be useful from a historical perspective, if for no other practical reason. This republication of Kelling’s chapter is hereby done under the intention of Fair Use; no copyright infringement intended.

 


Choosing your land is probably your most important consideration, and there are many things to take into account.

For starters, where would you like to live? To me, this is the most important question.

Then, where can you afford to live? Where can you find a piece of suitable land for $2,500? You’ll need to be realistic about this.

Is the county unzoned? I highly recommend a county with no zoning, because then you can pretty much do what you want, and erect what you want. Taxes are usually cheaper, and there’s generally no one to enforce county regulations. So while you’re at it, check into whether or not there are any county regulations that would affect you (such as having a well or cistern, and a septic system in before you could occupy the land). Continue reading

How Nonviolent Struggle Works?

“People who have held public positions during peace time should not be recruited for the [civilian] resistance movement. It is likely that these individuals will be arrested and subjected to brain washing. They should have no knowledge of the resistance movement, so your organization will not be compromised, nor lose members. Make sure this ‘basic rule of recruitment’ is well known, even to the enemy. Thus you can protect these valuable and courageous people to some degree since the enemy is aware of this policy, his interest in them will diminish. Examples of members unsuitable for the resistance movement are: prominent politicians both active or retired; leading economists, editors, professors, important administration officials. All these persons are too well known to participate in the ‘underground movement.’ They certainly will be shadowed, will be arrested sooner or later, or even executed. For them it is best to join guerrilla units.”

Major H. von Dach Bern

 

 

Satyagraha, simply defined, is using the force of truth alone in convincing opponents the righteousness of one’s cause. Often, suffering is inflicted upon practitioners of satyagraha by their enemies, yet their modus operandi is to stand firm until a mutually agreeable solution is negotiated. There is an assumption at work here that by reaching the conscience of one’s oppressors, satyagrahans are able to persuade them to remedy their grievances because there is, presumably, a limit to how many times, and how severely, each individual has within himself to hurt another man, face-to-face (of course, satyagraha assumes that oppressors have consciences worth appealing to in the first place).

A political scientist known as Gene Sharp has studied so-called “nonviolent struggle” in the attempt to not only comprehend it, but also to gauge its efficacy. Unfortunately, I’m left with the impression that satyagraha has a mean time to harassment (MTH) of exactly zero, because the whole idea of nonviolent struggle is to confront the State directly, as if nonviolent struggle were nothing more than a suicide pact. It’s almost as if satyagrahans throw themselves upon the gears of the State just to end up as nothing more than a pasty mush.

Sharp’s entire book appears to be collective-movementism on steroids, frankly. Considering the very existentiality of disingenuous activists and their fake grievances, it is merited to ask the quite uncomfortable question of, is there more to politics that pure spectacle? Generally speaking, I don’t mindlessly trust so-called “activists” farther than I can throw them, yet much like the politicians they appear to emulate, activists themselves are reminiscent of broken clocks, which by nature are correct twice a day. Continue reading

Privacy From the Tax Man (1997)

Today’s article is a chapter within Bill Kaysing’s 1997, Privacy: How to Get It, How to Enjoy It.” As part of an upcoming article about the notorious federal income tax, I figured some background material would be useful, at the very least, from a historical perspective, if nothing else. This republication of Kaysing’s chapter is hereby done under the intention of Fair Use; no copyright infringement intended.

 

 

Image from Bill Kaysing’s privacy book is hereby used under the intention of Fair Use; no copyright infringement intended.

 

 

There is one difference between a tax collector and a taxidermist: a taxidermist leaves the hide.


Property Taxes

To put it simply, do now own anything which warrants taxes. If you have a house you do not want to give up, then stop paying taxes on it. You will have five years to redeem the property. In that length of time, the house will probably appreciate enough to pay off the taxes when sold. In the meantime, there are no tax worries. You can invest your money in raw land, plant trees and other forms of vegetation, and come out way ahead by promoting the appreciation of farm land. Don’t forget: It is not necessary to pay taxes on that land, either! Continue reading