Agorist Class Theory

“A libertarian is someone who believes in the non-aggression principle. An anarchist is someone who understands it. An agorist is someone who practices it.”

Mike Zentz

 

 

Considering Sam Konkin’s previous work in the New Libertarian Manifesto, An Agorist Primer, and The Last, Whole Introduction to Agorism, you’d think that there’d be plenty enough literature establishing the basics of agorism, and for the most part, you’d be correct. However, further revisions and expansions upon agorism, such as Kyle Bennett’s An Agorist Manifesto in 95 Theses, greatly simplified many of the nuances and minutiae Konkin tried to communicate yet which Bennett actually succeeded in doing. Whether it be the Agorist Theory of the 5 Markets, or “black is beautiful,” the fact of the matter is that SEK3 didn’t have everything figured out, and what he was objectively correct about, he wasn’t always the best individual to convey those original ideas, hence the contributions of others who came later who were able to more effectively promote agorism. Continue reading

The Last, Whole Introduction to Agorism?

“It is the policy of the Revolutionary Agorist Cadre to deal with foreigners. Assuming they also wish to deal with us. Your other questions assume we are – or intend to become – a government. But we are agorists: propertarian anarchists. Our prosperity to date has come from following agoric principles we generally adopted. Why would we abandon market principles we have found efficacious in favor of hegemonic ones that have led society after society into ruin?”

Dr. Merce Rampart

 


As beautiful as a proposed libertarian strategy as it is, agorism is not without its faults. Seldom is there any genuine criticism of agorist theory or practice that is not just some regurgitation of political crusading by controlled schizophrenics who are emotionally invested in some sort of collective-movementism. Unfortunately, it would be a disservice to agorists not to offer a critique in good faith regarding their chosen approach to the problem of statism. Continue reading

An Agorist Primer

“You can be convicted of violating laws that don’t exist – as plenty of ‘tax criminals’ have been. Ask the IRS for copies of the laws you’re allegedly breaking and they’ll respond with legalistic gobbledegook. I have a friend who once testified as an expert witness in a tax case. Her expertise? Grammar. On the stand, she diagrammed a mega-monster sentence from the tax code and proved the alleged regulation couldn’t be obeyed – because it literally had no meaning in the English language. Still, people get arrested for disobeying it…[b]ottom line, you’re no longer a law-abiding citizen. There are too many laws to abide. And it doesn’t matter whether they call’em laws, rules, regulations, or something else altogether. You break them altogether. With laws like these, who even wants to be a law-abiding citizen?”

Claire Wolfe

 

 

Following up on the New Libertarian Manifesto, SEK3 elaborates upon agorism as a libertarian strategy, which hinges upon letting the black market choke the State into a well-deserved abolition. Setting the tone for the rest of this primer, Konkin defines agorism thusly:

 

“Agorism is the consistent integration of libertarian theory with counter-economic practice; an agorist is one who acts consistently for freedom and in freedom.”

 

By firmly insisting upon ends-means consistency (aka, integrity), SEK3 advocates for grey & black market trading as the means for achieving personal liberty. Unfortunately, if people aren’t willing to abstain from political crusading (as the voluntaryists demand is the minimum baseline for anti-political activity), then they sure as hell ain’t ready for agorism. Continue reading

[A] New Libertarian Manifesto

“Liberty depends on laws and their interpretations, and so is easily destroyed…laws and their interpretations often change…Big Brother already has 60 million laws and regulations or so. If all laws were consistently enforced, almost every man, woman and child would be in prison for one or more violations. But Big Brother can only extort so much taxes to hire bludg and build spy devices. And taxes are already to – or beyond – the point of diminishing return. Each additional rule to be enforced means existing rules get enforced less.”

Rayo (1983)

 

 

Agorism, simply defined, is a libertarian strategy that seeks to abolish the State through grey and black market trading. Etymologically, the very word “agora” means an open marketplace; in other words, an unlicensed, unregulated, untaxed, laissez-faire freed market. Samuel Edward Konkin III (aka, SEK3) birthed agorism in 1980 with the publication of the shortest manifesto I’ve ever read to date. Continue reading

Human Action!

“The origin of money is…entirely natural and thus displays legislative influence only in the rarest instances. Money is not an invention of the state. It is not the product of a legislative act. Even the sanction of political authority is not necessary for its existence. Certain commodities come to be money quite naturally, as the result of economic relationships that were independent of the power of the state.”

Carl Menger

 

 

Four and a half years ago, a reader of mine commented that I should study praxeology, which is the science of human action. As a skeptical empiricist, facts and evidence are important to me, yet, they cannot tell the entirety of the truth about a particular topic. Sometimes, logical deductions are more valuable than spending large and inordinate amounts of time and effort conducting never-ending research and studies that mostly tell you what is already knowable about the world, not just through hard-won personal experience, but also an extrapolated understanding of humanity through a truthful evaluation of one’s own values and actions.

Much like Ayn Rand’s fictional magnum opus, examining Ludwig von Mises’ non-fiction magnum opus could go in a lot of different directions, and it’s not just due to the sheer length of it. For my purposes of this report, I will focus on those highlights that really illuminated my understanding of economics more so than it already has been. Much like his other work Liberty & Property, Mises never fails to impart to me the dangers of economic illiteracy insofar as it impacts the human condition (such as it is). Continue reading

Permanent TAZs (1994)

Today’s article by Hakim Bey develops the concept of a Permanent Autonomous Zone (PAZ). It is an evolutionary step based upon Bey’s earlier idea of Temporary Autonomous Zones (TAZ). Any mistakes are solely that of the author himself.

 

 

TAZ-theory tries to concern itself with existing or emerging situations rather than with pure utopianism.   All over the world people are leaving or “disappearing” themselves from the Grid of Alienation and seeking ways to restore human contact.   An interesting example of this – on the level of “urban folk culture’ – can be found in the proliferation of hobby networks and conferences.   Recently I discovered the zines of two such groups, Crown Jewels of High Wire (devoted to the collection of glass electrical insulators) and a journal on cucurbitology (The Gourd).   A vast amount of creativity goes into these obsessions.   The various periodic gatherings of fellow-maniacs amount to genuine face-to-face (unmediated) festivals of eccentricity.   It’s not just the “counter-culture” which seeks its TAZs, its nomad encampments and nights of liberation from the Consensus.   Self-organized and autonomous groups are springing up amongst every “class” and “sub-culture”.   Vast tracts of the Babylonian Empire are now virtually empty, populated only by the spooks of MAssMedia, and a few psychotic policemen. Continue reading

The Agorist Cookbook (2011)

Today’s article is a parody of the lame and inaccurate so-called Anarchist Cookbook. It was written by privateer, of the real-life #agora IRC channel. For more information on agorism, please feel free to read An Agorist Manifesto in 95 Theses,” “Fifty Things to Do Now,” “An Agorist Anecdote,” “#agora,” and of course,Alongside Night.”

 

 

The Agorist Cookbook Introduction

This site is a place for Documenting: Tips, Tricks, Tools, Systems, Methods related to Operating in the Agorist Second Realm of Meatspace and Cyberspace. You will find a proverbial Wiki of Recipes for Agorist Markets and Living. A decent brief description from the Wikipedia Agorism entry describes Agorism as:

 

A political philosophy founded by Samuel Edward Konkin III and developed with contributions by J. Neil Schulman that holds as its ultimate goal bringing about a society in which all “relations between people are voluntary exchanges – a free market.” The term comes from the Greek word “agora,” referring to an open place for assembly and market in ancient Greek city-states. Ideologically, it is a term representing a revolutionary type of free-market anarchism. Schulman integrated the idea of counter-economics into Konkin’s libertarian philosophy, which is the advocacy of untaxed black market activity.

  Continue reading

Temporary Autonomous Zones (1991)

Today’s article by Hakim Bey is about carving out tiny pockets of freedom wherever you can. Bey seems to argue that such pockets are more likely to be mobile than stationary. Any mistakes are solely that of the author himself.

 

speakeasies & raves

 

 

“…this time however I come as the victorious Dionysus, who will turn the world into a holiday…Not that I have much time…”

–Nietzsche (from his last “insane” letter to Cosima Wagner)

 

Pirate Utopias

THE SEA-ROVERS AND CORSAIRS of the 18th century created an “information network” that spanned the globe: primitive and devoted primarily to grim business, the net nevertheless functioned admirably. Scattered throughout the net were islands, remote hideouts where ships could be watered and provisioned, booty traded for luxuries and necessities. Some of these islands supported “intentional communities,” whole mini-societies living consciously outside the law and determined to keep it up, even if only for a short but merry life. Some years ago I looked through a lot of secondary material on piracy hoping to find a study of these enclaves–but it appeared as if no historian has yet found them worthy of analysis. (William Burroughs has mentioned the subject, as did the late British anarchist Larry Law–but no systematic research has been carried out.) I retreated to primary sources and constructed my own theory, some aspects of which will be discussed in this essay. I called the settlements “Pirate Utopias.” Continue reading

Financial Independence: The Utility of Import-Export

“I often encourage folks who are preparedness-minded to develop a second income stream with a home-based business. Once you have that business started, then start another one…[a] successfully recession-proof home-based business is likely to be one in which the demand for your goods and services is consistent – even in a weak economy…[k]eep in mind that if you choose publishing or another mail-order venture selling something compact and lightweight, then you can take advantage of a national or even global market. But if you are selling a service or a relatively bulky or heavy hand-crafted item, then your market will be essentially local, so choose your venture wisely.”

James Rawles

 

 

Good Americans within the servile society typically “commute” five days a week in order to work eight hours per day. These “workers” often stop by grocery stores or similar businesses on their way home from work so as to pick up dinner every other day, or at least a few times a week. The problem with such a lifestyle is that the frequency of traveling to and fro on the government’s “public” roads increases the vulnerability to coercion of said motorists due to traffic stops.

Imagine, if you will, a noticeably different lifestyle whereby you travel once a week to a job site and work overtime while you’re there, and by the end of the week you go home. Similarly, you only shop for groceries once every few weeks or even several months out. Notice, too, that it’s not just the frequency of exporting labor and products relative to importing knowledge and supplies, but also the context of how you’re doing it.

Financial independence (FI) could be defined as making a livelihood without a steady employer. Absent a nine-to-five Just Over Broke (a “JOB”), many Good Americans literally wouldn’t know what to do with themselves, sadly because they are often indoctrinated to believe that their sense of self-worth is tightly bound to the consumerist fantasy of developing a “career,” an idea that has little to do with survivability and much to do with Stockholm Syndrome with the servile society itself. Often, FI can take the form of freelancing (working for a variety of clients on a per assignment basis) and/or intensive saving (a form of frugality whereby you save 50% – 80% of your take-home-pay). Continue reading

The Philosophy of Vonu (TVP Season 1 Overview)

“The ethical principal of non-coercion can be stated: One should not initiate the use of physical force against a volitional being or against property created or acquired through voluntary consent. Many people espouse this principle.”

Rayo

 

 

For this first season of The Vonu Podcast, Shane Radliff and I focused on the ideological pillars of vonu. The list of articles covering topics mentioned during season one of TVP are as follows:

Philosophically, vonu is inherently anti-political. Much like agorism, vonu outright rejects political crusading and collective-movementism, as well as the controlled schizophrenia underpinning both of them. The servile society incorporates all three of these phenomena so as to keep individuals trapped into being vulnerable to coercion, especially by the State. Continue reading